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BarCamp

BarCamp

A Bar Camp is an open "non-conference" that takes the form of participatory workshops-events where the content is provided by the participants who must all, in one capacity or another, bring something to the Barcamp, the objective is above all to share ideas.

Presentations by learners of several topics around a central theme to small groups of learners.

BarCamp

Resources produced as a result of a project: Escapade

Group size : Group (10-15 persons), Classroom (20-30 persons)

Modality : Presential

Duration of the teaching method : In a session

Special equipment : Space and sometimes projectors or boards or flip charts

Type of knowledge developed : Knowledge, Know-how

Target Audience : Students, Professionals in training

Course Type : Tutorials (TD)

Preparation time :½ organization day

Author and persons who made changes : Elsa Ballini

Why am I using this technique?

For my learners...

This approach enables teachers/trainers to involve learners in the course of training and to break away from the classic pattern of teacher/trainer transmission to learners.

During this activity, practitioners develop oral presentation skills but in a less stressful setting since they only face a small number of their peers. They must take responsibility and be proactive.

At the end of the sessions, the learners will have acquired a "knowledge catalogue" related to the theme addressed.

For me, teacher or trainer...

This activity requires an investment by the teacher/trainer to explain the process and the issues at stake. Once its methodology is in place, it can reuse the form and certain documents from one year to the next without requiring as much time.

This approach makes it possible to leave the traditional patterns of transmission, in particular in terms of knowledge, which is stimulating for a teacher/trainer in search of evolution or novelty as for his pedagogical approach.

Framework and steps / Instructions

The framework

This type of method is interesting for "catalogue" courses. It is also ideal if the goal is to make oral presentations to students but it would take too long to go through them one by one.

The preparation

We need to prepare topics.

These subjects must be mastered by the learners so that they can present them without preparatory work. The number of different subjects is equal to the minimum number of rotations during the BarCamp. Subjects can be assigned to a single learner or to several learners. If there are several, the teacher/trainer can choose whether they make the presentation together or separately.

A road map should be prepared that allows each learner to attend the presentations on each topic and make their own. This may involve times when learners do not attend a presentation.

You need one booth/table per topic. Different types of support may be necessary (video projector, board, flip chart...) depending on the presentation mode chosen by the teacher/trainer.

It is important to provide sufficient space according to the number of participants to ensure smooth movement and avoid excessive noise pollution.

The process

  1. Preparation of the work upstream by the trainer: choice of having the learners work individually or in groups, preparation of the subjects, reflection on the organisation of the activity in time and space (preparation of the roadmap).
  2. Introduce the activity to the learners (15 minutes): Explain the concept of the BarCamp and relate it to the proposed activity. Explanation of the teacher/trainer's expectations of the learners. Assignment of subjects to each group or individual (imposed or optional subjects). If learners choose their topic, allow extra time or ensure that their choice is made before the session begins.
  3. BarCamp : Distribution of a roadmap to each group/individual. He then sits at his first table and introduces his topic to a group of 4-5 people or attends the presentation of another. This is followed by a question-and-answer period. The duration of these two moments must be fixed, the whole presentation/questions should not exceed about fifteen minutes. At the end of this time, everyone goes to a new table according to their roadmap and another session of presentations is launched.

Evaluation

Organisation of a time with all participants (teacher(s)/trainer(s) and learners) to discuss how the BarCamp went.

Variants

The choice of topics to be developed in the theme can be linked to an experience common to the learners (example of professional internship for students) or an event related to the training (forum, exhibition...).

The BarCamp can be preceded by upstream sessions that allow students to work on their subject. The selected subjects can then ask for a bibliographic work upstream or a production work on behalf of the learners. (see connected plugs).

Self-evaluation of the participants, via a grid of criteria established by the teacher/trainer. Focus the evaluation on the form of the presentation by dividing the rating criteria among the different listeners (one on the gestures, another on the way of speaking...). However, they must justify their grade. Be careful how this evaluation is implemented so as not to have a counter-productive effect. It must be a small percentage of the final mark and its pedagogical interest must be highlighted.

Points of vigilance

Provide sufficient space (see several rooms) so that movement is fluid and there is no noise between different presentations.

Ensure that the assigned times for each phase are respected so that the activity is carried out effectively.

Activity not adapted to the transmission of fundamental knowledge.

It is necessary to communicate to students the importance of their involvement during the activity. There must be a reciprocal effort on the part of the teacher/trainer and the learners.

What if it doesn't work?

Some students do not participate in the BarCamp, for shyness for example, or for other reasons related to lack of motivation...

It is therefore necessary to find a way to maintain motivation during the BarCamp.

For example, note the dynamics of the group orally, plan an exam later on this BarCamp, value the best presentation,...


Useful links

Other resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BarCamp

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Educational system around the BarCamp

Educational system around the BarCamp

Application of the BarCamp concept with prior preparation by learners in a pedagogical approach.

Educational system around the BarCamp

Resources produced as a result of a project: Escapade

Group size : Group (10-15 persons), Classroom (20-30 persons)

Modality : Presential

Duration of the teaching method : An entire session, Over several sessions

Special equipment : Space and projectors or boards or flip charts. A way to phonetically isolate the different groups

Type of knowledge developed : Knowledge, Know-how

Target Audience : Students, Professionals in training

Course Type : Tutorials (TD), Course

Preparation time :½ organization day and 1 big preparation day

Author and persons who made changes : Elsa Ballini

Why am I using this technique?

For my learners...

This approach enables teachers/trainers to involve learners in the course of training and to break away from the classic pattern of teacher/trainer transmission to learners.

During this activity, the speakers are led to develop bibliographic reading, analysis, reflection, synthesis and oral presentation skills. They will also acquire teaching skills as the BarCamps progress, as they will see in use which presentations work with other students and which do not). They must take responsibility for the task (especially in the case of individual presentations) and be proactive.

At the end of the sessions, the learners will have acquired, in addition to the skills mentioned, a "knowledge catalogue" related to the theme addressed.

For me, teacher or trainer...

This activity requires an investment by the teacher/trainer to explain the process and the issues at stake.

Once its methodology is in place, it can reuse the form and some documents from one year to the next without requiring as much time (variations are detailed in the category below).

This approach makes it possible to leave the traditional patterns of transmission, in particular in terms of knowledge, which is stimulating for a teacher/trainer in search of evolution or novelty as for his pedagogical approach.

Framework and steps / Instructions

The framework

This type of method is interesting for "catalogue" courses.

It is also ideal if the objective is to make oral presentations to students. This type of learning corresponds to peer learning, it is based on the principle that students retain information better when it comes from another student rather than from a teacher.

The preparation

> See BarCamp sheet

If the number of learners is large, it is better to involve several teachers/trainers to supervise this pedagogical method.

The subjects can be very varied and unlike the traditional BarCamp, they are not already mastered by the learners. The subjects can be a set of texts on the subject if it is a bibliographic work that one wishes to do. But it can also be a production work that must then be presented orally.

The process

  1. Preparation of the work upstream by the trainer: choice of having the learners work individually or in groups, preparation of the subjects, reflection on the organisation of the activity in time and space. Availability of the assignment of subjects to each group/individual or of the list of available subjects to choose.
  2. First session to introduce the activity to the learners (15 minutes): Explain the concept of the BarCamp and relate it to the proposed activity. Explanation of the teacher/trainer's expectations of the learners. Following this session, the learners must begin to work on their own on their subject.
  3. Second session (1h): Focus session between the teacher/trainer and each group of learners. This allows learners to ask questions about their topic and the teacher/trainer to ensure that they have understood it correctly. This sequence can also be distributed within the course hours of the module (15 minutes to bridge the project).
  4. BarCamp" session (2h): See the BarCamp sheet. It is quite complex to set up a scheme allowing everyone to attend all the presentations. It is possible that each learner will only be present at a few presentations in order to feed the final debate. When the presentations are finished, a topic is chosen by the learners and is discussed by all groups/individuals during 30 to 45 minutes of final discussion.
  5. Then, if the content of the presentations is important and the knowledge must be assimilated by everyone, the learners (by subject group) must submit at the end of the session a summary sheet on their work topic. As the set will be distributed to all groups, they will ultimately have access to a complete knowledge catalogue on the theme studied.

Evaluation

Organisation of a time with all participants (teacher(s)/trainer(s) and learners) to discuss how the whole activity went.

Variants

Peer evaluation of participants, via a grid of criteria established by the teacher/trainer. Focus the evaluation on the form of the presentation by dividing the rating criteria among the different listeners (one on the gestures, another on the way of speaking...). However, they must justify their grade.

Be careful how this evaluation is implemented so as not to have a counter-productive effect. It must be a small percentage of the final mark and its pedagogical interest must be highlighted.

Points of vigilance

The development of a complex work subject which requires a long work on the part of the students implies work in autonomy on their part over a long period before the restitution in common, to be adapted according to the work required, this can exceed the month.

> See BarCamp sheet

What if it doesn't work?

Some students do not participate in the BarCamp, for shyness for example, or for other reasons related to lack of motivation... It is therefore necessary to find a way to maintain motivation during the BarCamp.

For example, note the dynamics of the group orally, plan an exam later on this BarCamp, value the best presentation,...


Useful links

Other resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BarCamp

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[Ice Breaker] - Dynamizer Game

The icebreaker is a method of waking up an audience, stimulating them and encouraging them to speak out. It is very simple to set up and requires very little upstream preparation.

[Ice Breaker] - Dynamizer Game

Group size : Group (10-15 persons), Classroom (20-30 persons), Amphitheater, large group

Modality : Presential

Duration of the teaching method : In a session

Special equipment : A large room suitable for travel

Type of knowledge developed : Social skills

Target Audience : Students, Professionals in training

Course Type : Tutorials (TD)

Preparation time :Negligible

Author and persons who made changes : Nathalie Agbagla

Why am I using this technique?

For my learners...

Facilitate contact between people who know little or nothing about each other.

  • The participants are then "connected" and have more facility to overcome the fear of speaking in a group.
  • They are stimulated, their curiosity is aroused, the participants are more dynamic and attentive for the rest of the session.

For me, teacher or trainer...

Disturbing the students by encouraging them to walk around the room, contrary to their habits, gradually establishes a good mood and an atmosphere of benevolence within the group. He also removes distance from the teacher who proposes him, if he participates.

Framework and steps / Instructions

The framework

It is often offered at the beginning of training in order to facilitate the first contact between learners. It can be proposed at any time when the trainer observes an inertia of the participants (as is the case in the example developed here).

The preparation

A large enough room is needed to allow participants to move around. For example, it is rather difficult to set it up in an amphitheatre because of the constrained layout of the space. If necessary, move the tables and chairs to the sides of the room upstream or ask the participants to do so. It is also possible to create "meanders" or obstacles to avoid the pitfall of less productive circle movements from the point of view of the method's objective.

The process

  1. The trainer first asks them to move around the room in silence.
  2. Then he gradually adds different instructions.
  3. For example, looking into each other's eyes when they meet.
  4. Finally, they have to look at each other, smile at each other and say hello.

Evaluation

There is no method to measure the impact of the Icebreaker Dynamizer. The simple fact of observing the participants, however, allows us to see if it is effective.

At the beginning of the teaching method, if they are confused and lost, it is because the first level of the objective is reached. Then, the trainer must be attentive and look if interactions have improved in quantity (more participation) and quality (caring, listening).

Variants

Possible set point variants :

  1. Ask participants to touch each other's little fingers, say something, shake hands or hug. In the latter case, make sure in advance that it is acceptable to participants or bring it gradually, and respect those who do not want to do so.
  2. When there are many participants (a full amphitheatre), separating them into two groups allows the trainer to manage the situation of the large number and the constraint of space. As a result, the mass effect is reduced. While one group is up, the other half of the amphitheatre follows different instructions.
  3. For example, if standing people are told to be quiet, those who are sitting should talk loudly.
  4. Also possible: while some go clockwise, others go anti-clockwise; some say hello, others respond with a smile, etc..

The possibilities are numerous and leave a lot of creativity to the trainer!

Points of vigilance

Pay attention to the size of the group, individual limits, "habits and customs"...

What if it doesn't work?

If it doesn't work, you have to realize it quickly and adapt to your audience. This requires observation and perception.

For example, propose a more appropriate alternative instruction and stop earlier than expected. Continue with another pedagogical practice, but you must either have prepared it or master it. It is also possible to propose a quick debriefing at the end of the pedagogical practice to remobilize the participants.


Testimonials

This method creates a good atmosphere. Students are surprised, even disbelieved, at first, then get caught up in the game. I had more respondents from them throughout the rest of the course!

This type of course was quite original and much more motivating than a simple lecture!

Facilitate contact between people who know little or nothing about each other.

  • The participants are then "connected" and have more facility to overcome the fear of speaking in a group.
  • They are stimulated, their curiosity is aroused, the participants are more dynamic and attentive for the rest of the session.

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Introduce courses and subjects (or training)

Introducing your courses, training or subject matter is important even though it may sometimes seem unnecessary. The idea is to allow the learners to grasp the usefulness of these sessions that he will follow and to explain to them how the sessions will take place. This motivates the learners and improves their posture in front of the courses that will follow.

Introduce courses and subjects (or training)

Group size : Small group (4-5 persons), Group (10-15 persons), Classroom (20-30 persons), Amphitheater, large group

Modality : Presential

Duration of the teaching method : In a session, An entire session

Target Audience : Students, Professionals in training

Course Type : Course

Preparation time :1h for the first time

Author and persons who made changes : No author

Why am I using this technique?

For my learners...

In an educational relationship it is important that everyone's place and role are clearly defined. This lays the foundation for the relationship within the group. That is what this introduction allows. It also allows the learner to question himself about his presence in this course, about what the course will bring him. That way he'll be more involved, more motivated.

It also has a small icebreaker side thanks to the interactions.

For me, teacher or trainer...

It allows to see a little the group that there is opposite, to know its expectations but also its a priori about the matter. And once again to have defined the role of each one and to have explained to the learners the pedagogical approach is important.

Framework and steps / Instructions

The framework

This introduction can only be useful if the teacher will have other courses with the same group, on the same topic/subject. This lends itself well to year-round (or almost year-round) courses. For example, a modern language course (English). The introduction must then be given during the very first class with the learners.

The preparation

There is no particular material, it depends on the form in which you want to make your introduction. You can use nothing, use a slide show (you need a projector and the appropriate cable), use a board, use flip charts, etc....

The process

Before embarking on this introduction, you should of course introduce yourself, and why not also do an icebreaker with the group, or just a tour of the first names (if the size of the group allows it).

THE STEPS

If the group is relatively small, we can start by asking everyone to complete these 3 sentences: during class I would like..., I would not like..., at the end of all classes I want... And everyone gives their answers in turn. If the group is too large, there are possible alternatives (see Variants).

Then we will ask the learners 3 introspective questions:

  • What am I doing here? (when I could be in my bed)
  • What's the point of me attending this class?
  • What can a teacher do? (while I have my computer and internet access).

We ask the first question. The group of learners is then asked for an initial response. If no one is speaking, do not hesitate to name someone. Then the teacher also provides prepared answers. This can take several forms: a simple answer, anecdotes or more playful like a quiz to draw attention to certain points, ... Then with a small transitional sentence we go to the second question and we start again, and we do the same thing with the third question.

  • Question one: What am I doing here?

It is a question of showing the interest of such a subject/course for the learner's personal pleasure/general culture/career path.

  • Question two: What do I need it for?

In continuity with the usefulness of the subject/courses for the learner's professional career, it is necessary to highlight the importance of the knowledge/know-how/being-knowledge that the learner will acquire, how it will be useful to him, how it is already useful to others who have made the same career path.

  • Question three: Why have a teacher?

It is true that new technologies, the Internet in particular, can call into question its usefulness, yet it is rarely questioned and the role of a teacher is rarely defined, as if it were self-evident. This question allows you to set things straight and to introduce the logic and the pedagogical method that will be used throughout the course.

AND AFTER

For the following courses, it is important to follow the pedagogy announced during this introduction, but this is quite obvious.

Evaluation

The impact on learners is difficult to assess. It is up to you, the teacher, to feel if the posture that the learners then take in front of the teaching is the one sought or not. If not, perhaps the introduction should be repeated a little.

Discussing this introduction with the learners, what they thought, if they have any comments,... can also be interesting.

Variants

For the first part with the 3 questions (during the course I would like, ...), if the group of learners is large, can be done differently (otherwise it would take too long). It all depends on what you, the teacher, want to do with it. If the question is purely rhetorical (your curriculum and pedagogy are already established and you will not change them) then instead of asking everyone to answer the question, simply ask a small number of learners, volunteers or randomly selected, to answer it. If you really want to have a clear view of the group's expectations, you can ask them to write their answer on a sheet of paper that you will collect. You can also do both: have them answer on paper and then interview a few learners, but it takes a little longer.

This method can also be used to introduce training. The idea is then to make learners understand the interest of the training (interesting if they do it by obligation) and to explain the pedagogy that will be used during this training time. The detailed training programme can also be presented at the end of the introduction.

Points of vigilance

We must try to anticipate the type of response that learners can give to the questions asked, in order to be ready to bounce back on them. But you also have to be prepared for unexpected answers. And we must also be able to continue if learners do not give the expected answers.

It is necessary to be vigilant with the subjects or supports used to bring its answers. If one of them creates a blockage in one or more learners, they will not participate. It can even block the dynamics of the whole group. And the subjects which block depend on the public, it is necessary to know how to adapt to this one.

What if it doesn't work?

If you use a support, in particular a slide show or other video-projected tool, you are not safe from a technical problem. Then you have to find a solution: either you manage to solve the technical problem, or you do your introduction without support. It is of course also possible not to do the introduction but it would be a shame because it is not something that can be saved for the next course.

Another problem may come from the group: if learners do not know each other and are not comfortable they may have difficulty speaking. Sometimes this is not disturbing, it does not mean that they do not think about the issue in their head. But if this blocks the dynamics of the presentation, then the solution is to randomly assign a learner to respond.


Testimonials

For me the objective of this course is to create group dynamics, to create motivation. It is also about discussing the educational contract between me and the group. I have always had only positive feedback.

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The Graduated Method

Following a course already given, some key points can be identified as barriers to understanding and learning. The aim of the progressive method is to return to these points during a TD by proposing one or more activities to the learners.

The activity is done initially in pairs then in small groups then possibly in larger groups.

The Graduated Method

Group size : Group (10-15 persons), Classroom (20-30 persons), Amphitheater, large group

Modality : Presential

Duration of the teaching method : In a session, An entire session, Over several sessions

Special equipment : A modular work room

Type of knowledge developed : Knowledge

Target Audience : Students, Professionals in training, Particularly suitable for groups with cultural heterogeneity

Course Type : Tutorials (TD)

Preparation time :2h

Author and persons who made changes : No author

Why am I using this technique?

For my learners...

To memorize, learners need to mobilize and apply their knowledge. This can of course be done through classical exercises but also through play.

In a more playful way, learners cram while having fun. Indeed in this game questions come back, so by repeating, they memorize.

It is also a pleasant moment, with a good atmosphere, which can be interesting for the dynamics and cohesion of the group.

For me, teacher or trainer...

The progressive method is a stimulating method that raises questions and allows interaction with learners. It breaks the rhythm of the class and avoids the boredom of the monologue in front of an assembly that falls asleep and makes you want to sleep.

Framework and steps / Instructions

The preparation

It is advisable to have access to a modular room that allows the tables to be placed in "islands" in order to facilitate group work and communication. Specific material depending on the proposed activity.

The process

  1. Beforehand, it is necessary to identify the key points of the course that may be an obstacle to understanding in order to propose an adapted activity. The activity highlights a paradox or questioning element. It can also use transversal capacities.
  2. The activity may consist of answering a course question, making a diagram, solving a calculation problem, brainstorming and prioritizing ideas, etc. What is important is to have a statement that sounds stimulating.
  3. Learners work on the activity in pairs and then in groups. This method allows you to compare your ideas. It is particularly interesting to do with a multicultural group.  It can be interesting to define groups in advance for their heterogeneity.

Variants

The method can also be applied during a class to break its monotony: offer learners a small activity or ask a question to do alone then in pairs.

Points of vigilance

Care must be taken to have the necessary materials in advance as well as the distribution of learners in the groups.
It is important to be careful at the right time because it is possible to get into a debate quickly and get away from the subject.
During working time in pairs, learners should be motivated to engage in the activity.

What if it doesn't work?

There is always knowledge acquired as in any classical teaching.


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World coffee

It is a dynamic group work where different workshops are proposed. It mobilizes the qualities of expression (oral and written) and creativity of the participants.

World coffee

Group size : Classroom (20-30 persons), Amphitheater, large group

Modality : Presential

Duration of the teaching method : An entire session

Special equipment : A3 sheets, felt-tip pens, flipchart / board, fixed paste or scotch. Modular room

Type of knowledge developed : Social skills

Target Audience : Students, Professionals in training, Particularly suitable for groups with cultural heterogeneity, Particularly suitable for mixed groups

Course Type : Tutorials (TD)

Preparation time :Between 30 minutes and 1h, maybe more for the first time

Author and persons who made changes : Nathalie Agbagla, Laurent Tézenas

Why am I using this technique?

For my learners...

On the one hand, learners' personal knowledge and experiences are mobilized. On the other hand, this method reinforces group work.

Indeed, work is productive only if it is organized. It promotes group cohesion, listening and mobilizes the creativity of participants in a fun way. The work is dynamic and in a friendly atmosphere (food and drinks are allowed).

Moreover, continuing the work started by a previous group enriches the learners: on how to organize the knowledge on paper, the reasoning used as well as the knowledge, experiences and opinions that are shared, being confronted with other ideas, point of view...

For me, teacher or trainer...

The preparation phase of this method requires time and organization during its development.

However, the teacher/trainer plays the role of facilitator during the session, and this breaks the monotony of more traditional courses. Moreover, it removes the distance between the learner and the teacher and the session takes place in a good mood.

Framework and steps / Instructions

The framework

If knowledge needs to be mobilized, it is best to apply it in the session following the theoretical course or at the end of the module.
As part of a training course, at the end of the morning or at the end of the day.

The preparation

  • Sufficient number of A3 sheets
  • One flip chart OR A4 sheets (workshop plan)
  • A large modular room with tables and chairs OR several adjacent rooms
  • Fixed paste OR scotch
  • A painting OR a large wall

The process

PREPARATION BEFORE THE SESSION

  1. Select the themes for each workshop (a general theme addressed from different viewpoints/ways OR different sub-themes). That is, at each table, a question is submitted to the participants
  2. Divide participants into groups in a heterogeneous way (different culture, student background, professional)
  3. Print the route maps of each group with
        •    the names of the participants
        •    the order of participation in the workshops
        •    a brief reminder of the essential instructions
  4. Print the theme of each workshop OR draw a map of the workshops with their theme on the board (OR flip chart)

INSTALLATION

A single facilitator is sufficient to organize the session. The first step is to prepare the room or ask the participants to help set up the tables and chairs.

A great deal of attention must be paid to explaining the instructions at the beginning of the session. This step is essential for the proper functioning of the World Café.

Explaining also the expected purpose and why this method is being applied allows participants to better understand what is expected of them.

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Participants are divided into groups. Groups participate in all workshops once. Each workshop is short between 10 and 15 minutes and the facilitator plays the role of time master. Once the time is up, the group moves to the next workshop, noted on their roadmap.
  2. The participants are expected to contribute their knowledge, experience and ideas in a synthetic and creative way. They must also use the feedback from groups that have previously come to the workshop, compare their ideas...
  3. All participants spoke. Good mood, friendly atmosphere and listening are the watchwords to remember.
  4. At the end of the session, each group must report the whole of the work of the workshop where it is, and this in 1 min orally.

THE UNWOUND

Once the learners have had the instructions the session can begin. 1 minute before the end of the workshop, the teacher-trainer must remind people who have not spoken that minute to do so.

Participants are often a little confused at the beginning of the exercise, then gradually learn to be effective and productive in a very short time. The final restitution: during the last rotation, the participants do not complete the work already done, or only if they consider that ideas are missing. Then they choose someone to speak. This exercise also helps to be synthetic and get to the point.

Evaluation

Debriefing can be an integral part of the World Coffee, but it all depends on the purpose of the work (to develop more in-depth knowledge, substance or rather a form of work such as group work).

It is a phase or once again, the distance between teacher and student decreases. The participants feel listened to, solicited by the person who set up the method. Their feelings, what they remember about the method, if there are things to improve and why are so much useful information.

In the case where the objective is to review more advanced knowledge, this makes it possible to synthesize all the knowledge seen, and to be able to keep these syntheses at hand (with a view to an examination for example).

Variants

  • With a rapporteur: when changing workshops, one person from each group stays on the workshop and summarizes to the arriving group what has been done. So at the beginning of the World Café, this person stays twice on the same workshop. When changing workshops, this rapporteur leaves and is replaced by a member of the group to whom he has summarized the workshop, and so on...
  • With different questions of form: video, object, photograph/image, quotation...

Points of vigilance

  • Ensure the heterogeneity of the groups (work to be done upstream),
  • Explain the instructions well at the beginning of the World Café,
  • Pay attention to the time given to participants.

What if it doesn't work?

It should show right away. No group interactions... in this case, take the time to explain again what the participants should do and what is expected of them.


Testimonials

I keep a very good memory of this exercise! It was stimulating, everyone participated, it was original to work in this way. Good mood and friendly atmosphere were there.

On the one hand, learners' personal knowledge and experiences are mobilized. On the other hand, this method reinforces group work.

Indeed, work is productive only if it is organized. It promotes group cohesion, listening and mobilizes the creativity of participants in a fun way. The work is dynamic and in a friendly atmosphere (food and drinks are allowed).

Moreover, continuing the work started by a previous group enriches the learners: on how to organize the knowledge on paper, the reasoning used as well as the knowledge, experiences and opinions that are shared, being confronted with other ideas, point of view...

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